Zucchini Oat Muffins (No Oil, No Refined Sugar)

One of my sweet kiddos experiences tummy troubles (constipation) which has caused me to become more creative in my meal prep. For those out there who may be looking for healthy muffins (that can also help little kids with constipation), this is for you! As a disclaimer, I like baking but I am not a “baker.” πŸ™‚

Ingredients

  • 1 and 2/3 C flour
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 C honey
  • 1/2 C milk
  • 1/2 C applesauce
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 grated zucchini
  • 1/2 C oats
  • Optional: 3 tbsp of flax seeds (Note: Flax seeds help with constipation but change the flavor of the muffins significantly)

Steps

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • In a large mixing bowl, mix together flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt and cinnamon.
  • Add all remaining ingredients to the mixing bowl and stir until just combined (it will be lumpy).
  • Bake for 15-17 minutes.
  • This recipe yields 12 muffins.

David at Two-and-a-Half

David is officially two-and-a-half years old. In the last six months, his language skills have exploded. He is good at using words to ask for what he wants. One cute thing he does when looking for a specific toy is call out its name over and over as he walks around the house. It’s almost like he’s expecting the toy to respond and say, “I’m right here, David.”

On Friday as we were driving in the car, I played the Newsies soundtrack. For the first time ever, David started singing along. I was amazed at how well he could sing the right pitches and match the vowel sounds of a lot of the words. For Christmas, John purchased tickets for him and I to go see the musical Newsies. Ever since then, the kids and I have been listening to the soundtrack a lot in the car. David says “Newsies” when he gets in the car and wants to listen to the music.

He loves his sunglasses.

David loves to sing the primary song I Am a Child of God, Jingle Bells, and a Halloween song that my Grandma Daly made up (I don’t know if the song has a name). He also loves Baby Shark and The Wheels on the Bus. I love how he sings, “The babies on the bus go ‘wah, wah’ wah…'” The way he imitates how babies cry is so cute and hilarious.

When we lived in West Virginia, we’d go to library story time in Purcellville. Afterwards, they’d have playtime, and David loved these cars that hook together.

He watches one episode of TV each weekday generally before lunch time. The two shows he watches are Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood and Sesame Street, which he calls “Sunny Days” because the Sesame Street theme song begins with the phrase “Sunny days…”

When we were packing up to move, I labeled each tub with green painters tape and wrote on the tape the name of the room where the tub should go in the new house. David loved to pull the tape off. He called the tape “stickers.” I loved that he labeled himself with the “David’s Room” “sticker.”

He’s become a skilled negotiator with his sister. If she is playing with a toy he wants, he’s learned to bring a toy to her that he can trade her. Even if the toy he brings is not nearly as cool or exciting, she always takes the bait haha.

This was the first year that Easter eggs were exciting to David.

One of David’s favorite phrases to say is “Hi David.” Ever since David was little, in the mornings as I walked down the hall to his bedroom, I’d say “Hi David.” I think hearing this phrase repeatedly each day caused David’s mind to view this phrase as a generic greeting like “Good morning.” Consequently, over the last couple months, when David would hear either John or I in the morning, he’d yell “Hi David” from his bedroom. He would never say “Hi Mommy” or “Hi Daddy.” It was always “Hi David.” (Last week was the first time I’ve heard him say “Hi Mommy” in the morning instead of “Hi David.”)

He knows that when we drive in the Shenandoah mountains that we like to take pictures. Once he realizes we’re driving in the mountains, he says “pi-churs, pi-churs.”

His favorite food is apple sauce, which he just calls “sauce.” He’s become more picky about what veggies he eats, but I still serve veggies with every meal πŸ™‚ He also loves all carbs – rolls, muffins, etc. I’ve learned how to make “healthier” rolls and muffins so I can feel better about what I’m serving him.

David is a light in our home. His happy demeanor that he had as a baby has continued with him. He’s a great listener and generally very obedient (sometimes he likes to march to the beat of his own drum ha). He’s a loving brother and son. Although, he thinks it’s funny to withhold hugs and kisses some nights at bedtime. We sure love him and his sense of humor.

Our special time of day together is right before afternoon nap time. I put Brooke down first, and then David and I have time together to read books. This is a “selfie” we took last week after finishing our daily story time.

Easter 2020

Sunday was Easter, and it was such a wonderful day. I woke up early enough that I was able to get fully ready and read in the scriptures before my kids woke up. I feel like when I’m able to do that, I have a better day. After the kids woke up, it was fun to watch them discover their Easter baskets. John made me a delicious egg sandwich for breakfast. While the kids played, we listened to two really great talks (devotionals); “Sunday Will Come” by Elder Wirthlin and “Mrs. Patton – The Story Continues” by President Monson. We took David to the backyard to hunt for Easter eggs. Then we had lunch and put the kids down for naps. I was able to take a nap for 30 minutes. Then I got up, did some Easter dinner food prep, polished my Grandma Daly’s silver (which we used for the dinner), and set the table. I took a break from the prep to sit down with John and discuss our insights about Easter and Christ’s sacrifice and resurrection. This conversation was a highlight of my day. We then had a fun evening full of chatting, laughter, delicious food, and games. When I went to bed, my heart was full and I was a little sad the day was over.

COVID-19

I want to take just a few minutes to write down some thoughts about this unprecedented time. My prayers and thoughts are with all those affected physically, emotionally, and/or economically right now because of COVID-19.

As a stay-at-home mom of a 2-year-old and a 1-year-old, my life has not been impacted significantly. Aside from missing outings like library story time and lunches at Chick-Fil-A, life for me on the surface is very similar to what it’s been. I enjoy being home with David and Brooke and watching them play together. David is really starting to use his imagination. It is also very nice to have John home more often while he works from home. The kids LOVE when he comes upstairs from the basement to grab a bite to eat.

It is weird to go to the grocery store and see lots of items missing from shelves. Thankfully, John suggested very early on that we stock up on some things. So, I did a lot of my shopping for staples (like toilet paper) before the masses. We also live in a more rural area, and from what I hear, our grocery stores are a little better stocked than those closer to Washington D.C. where my brother and sister live.

I’m so thankful we moved before all the “shelter-in-place” business began. I love our new home, and I especially love the views. When I look outside and see God’s beautiful creations, I feel peace. I go on a walk each day, and I cherish those times. Sometimes I listen to podcasts and other times I whisper a silent prayer in my heart as I walk.

Our house in West Virginia officially sold this past Friday, and for that I am extremely grateful! I can only imagine the anxiety I’d be wrestling with if it were still on the market during this time.

Our family started a tradition of taking a drive through Shenandoah National Park each Sunday while we don’t have church. It’s fun to drive up to the lookouts and then look for our house.

I’m not sure how long it will be until life feels “normal” again for our communities. I’m grateful for those who are working to combat the virus and for those serving individuals who are suffering.